katie on May 31st, 2016

After about ten attempts to convince the computer that the printer is, in fact, attached to it, exactly as it has been for years, I gave up. It thinks there is no printer, and I can’t convince it otherwise. So, no printed newsletter in your bag today.

Part of me likes the idea of just doing the newsletter online every week. Fewer dead trees, fewer soggy newsletters if it’s raining. But i pack for the lowest common denominator among us, and that person is actually ME. If I were a bag-receiving Bean, I would never, ever bother going to the computer and going to the website to read about the bag’s contents each week. If the bag contained something I didn’t recognize – I know this about myself – I would put that item on the kitchen counter and hope that somehow, mystically, a message from the cosmos would arrive enlightening me. Eventually it would rot and I would throw it into the compost, still clueless. But I’d never bother to actually look for the newsletter online and find out.

You are obviously more grown up, because you’re here reading this, so, yay for you. Maybe next week we’ll be back to a printed newsletter. (More likely, I’ll be waiting for the cosmos to magically fix the printer.) Anyway, here’s what you’ve got:

Strawberries. You have strawberries, and they are perfection. You probably don’t even care what you have otherwise, because you have strawberries.  Enjoy. They are magical this year, just the right amount of rain, and then strong sun as they ripened this past week.

You have two bags, and we sure hope they’re different. One should be kale and one should have lettuce and spinach. Now, here’s the thing. We got to the end of the packing process, the very last bag, and found that we had two bags of lettuce/spinach and no bags of kale. This means that someone’s bag has two bags of kale and no lettuce. So, we went through every single green bag, but couldn’t find the mistake. This now means (it’s sort of like a flow chart of screwups sometimes) that either someone has two bags of kale but we couldn’t find that bag, or that we packed one too many lettuce bags, or one fewer kale bag than needed in the first place. By now it was time to pack the bags into vehicles and get on the road, and we were aware that there was bad traffic heading out of town, so essentially we gave up. Carl, whose bag was packed last, has two lettuce/spinach bags and no kale. Someone else, maybe, has two kales. We’re sorry about this, but we just couldn’t solve it in time. This sort of thing is why your farmer often drinks heavily on Tuesday nights. Sigh.

You have snap peas if you’re a full share and radishes if you’re a small share; that worked out best for this week. The herb is mojito mint, which your farmer has thoughtfully tested in multiple mojito recipes and pronounced them all yummy. Green onions. the last asparagus for this season.  (this was, b the way, the first year for the asparagus bed, and there’s a whole other bed coming on line next year.  The first bed will bear more heavily, and the newer bed will have some gorgeous purple asparagus.)  If you get eggs, you have the right number this week, and we’ll start adding some extras next week to make up for last week’s shortages. The ladies have recovered from the fox-induced trauma of last week and are cheerfully popping out eggs again.

Thank you all for returning your green bags each week. We have no spares at all, so it’s a great help to have them returned. Otherwise, we’re less efficient, and, you know, might start messing up the kale bag count or something.

Love from your farmer,
katie

Otherwise, well, it’s been hot and sticky, enough so that the usual no-whining rule was suspended during harvesting and prep, and there was considerable griping. But the gardens look good. The big plants sale weekends are done, and now I’m getting a lot of the extra plants in the ground. We have the first baby tomatoes forming in the greenhouse, and there will be squash in next week’s bags. The dreaded allium leafminer showed up in the greenhouse but not in the field, which is actually a good thing in the sense that it means I can take some preventive measures for the field planting – there are two organic sprays that are safe to use, and they can be effective if timed correctly. My guess is that the adult leafminers were attracted to the warmer greenhouse environment a few days earlier than the field, so I have a short window in which to apply the spray. If we’re lucky, this will hold them off and we’ll be able to harvest full size onions later it he summer.

There’s baby turkeys on the back porch, which let me tell you is a special olfactory treat in hot weather. They’ve got to stay there until they are fully feathered and no longer need the heat lamp to stay warm.

I can only accept registrations up until Saturday, April 9 for this year’s CSA. (Anything postmarked on that day will be accepted.)

Some larger CSA programs accept members year round. With a relatively small acreage, that’s not possible here. This is the point where I need to know numbers for the season so I can plant accordingly. If I keep the registration process open and guess incorrectly, I risk having an insufficient amount of everything, or far too much. So it’s time to make a decision. If you have any questions, hit the contact button at the top of the page, and send me a message.

katie on February 3rd, 2016

So, it’s time to sign up.  SHARES ARE STILL AVAILABLE – I’LL POST SOMETHING THAT MAKES IT CLEAR WHEN THEY ARE NOT.

This is the point when I really wish I could create a post with pictures of a glowing, svelte, bursting-with-health-and-energy farmer, and write up a little copy insinuating that if you join my CSA you’ll be every bit as vibrant and glowing and so on.  I mean, I really want to write that post.  I want to be the woman in that picture.  I want to be your role model.  I have this mental picture of you opening my brochure or looking my website and thinking “whoa, I want to be like her, so I’m going to sign up now!”

But here’s my reality:  I’m 57, overweight, I drink far too much coffee, and my truck seems to drive itself to Neato Burrito.

So, I can’t offer the role model thing.  Not this year, anyway.  What I can do is to invite you on the journey with me.  I am a well intentioned mess. But that’s just a starting point, because every day I have the opportunity to do a little better.

The older I get, the more I realize that more people are like me than not – we are, most of us, a well intentioned mess.  We are all works in progress.  So why don’t we help each other out?  The “C” in CSA stands for “community”.  This is the year that I really want to emphasize the community aspect of Cool Beans.  It’s already there – you share recipes with me and I pass them on to other members, you help each other out on pickup days, and so on.  But I’m ramping this aspect up this year.  I’m ironing out the details for a partnership with a local shelter, and we’re going to grow fresh food for the people who find themselves seeking a safe place there.  You can help, if you want.  We’ll tweak the Facebook page so you can post directly and we can support each other.  We’ll do more events on the farm this year.  (The honest truth is that I kept waiting ‘until we got things cleaned up around here’ to do that.  And now, with this new-found wisdom, I recognize that this is never going to happen.  So, let’s just have some parties anyway.)

Every local CSA offers beautiful food – they’re all run by good, honest, hardworking people who I am honored to consider my friends.  If mine doesn’t sound right for you, check them out, and you’ll surely find the right match.  But, if you want to come along on my journey to be – well, to be what I was originally created to be, before all my bad habits got in the way – then I would love to have you in Cool Beans, and I will take good care of you.

The ‘SA’ part of CSA stands for ‘supported agriculture’.  Community supported agriculture.  And that’s where the contract comes in (there’s a link at the top of the page) and the check that you need to write to join.  I’m growing some wonderful, healthy food here, and growing it in a way that respects the extraordinary place we live in – a friend called it the ‘sacred joining of ancient waters and earth’.  It costs some money to do so, both for supplies and labor.  If I could do this for free, I would, but I can’t.  Barter options are available, contact me if the cost is an issue, and let’s see what we can do.

There’s links at the top of the page that explain how this works in much more detail.  If you’re new to the whole concept, start with the ‘about Cool Beans CSA’ link for an overview.  And don’t hesitate to contact me with questions.

Sign up.  Sign up, grab my hand, and let’s get better – healthier, stronger, and keeping this beautiful world safer and cleaner.  And next year, you can pose for the brochure pictures with me.

katie on February 2nd, 2016

Alert readers, or those who happen upon the page today, will notice that the 2016 regular season contract is up, but the ‘info’ link hasn’t yet changed to reflect the regular season and not the winter season.  It’s a winter delivery today, and I wanted to have contracts in the bags, so I updated the contract, but the rest has to wait until I get back from deliveries.  Because even though it’s February and theoretically a farmer’s down time, I’m really scrambling this week.  Which may not inspire confidence, if you’re checking things out for the first time, but it’s my reality, so probably best that you know.  Anyway.  Details updated later tonight.  Love.

katie on November 7th, 2015

Time to sign up for the winter season, which should be excellent – the early November warmth has been an unexpected bonus as we’re getting baby greens and root crops established in the hoophouse for winter.  There’s a few changes since last year, and some of you are here for the first time, so let me sort of talk through the winter CSA and see if I can hit on the most frequently asked questions.  If you’re already sure you want in, just click on the link at the top of this page for the new sign-up sheet.

CSA stands for ‘community supported agriculture’, and members, in  sense, buy a share of the farm’s output for the season.  You don’t choose what goes in your bag, but you’ll know it was grown organically, sustainably, locally, and with love!

What do you actually get in a winter CSA?  Well, there’s an amazing amount of things that can grow here year-round, given the proper conditions and care.  This will be the third year the hoophouse has been operational during the winter, and the two winters I’ve used it so far have run the gamut – one warm, one very cold.  So I’ve learned a lot about winter farming in the extremes, and I feel ready for whatever comes our way this year.  Winter CSA is heavy on greens – spinaches, lettuces, chard, microgreens, sprouts, Asian braising greens – but there will also be tiny winter carrots (they’re the sweetest!), and potatoes, and homemade jam, and winter squashes, and all sorts of good things.

Winter bags are prepared every TWO weeks, and that works out well because unlike summer harvests, winter greens keep extremely well.

One change from previous years is that I’m going to just say upfront that the delivery dates listed below are targets, and there will be some flexibility if there is bad (really bad) weather.  Last year, we had one memorable snowy / icy day, and I was so proud of myself for making all the deliveries on time; I’d set the alarm for 3 am, packed bags, left three hours early, and drove white-knuckled all across the area to drop the bags.  I finally got home, warmed up, relaxed…..and started getting emails from Beans saying they were unable to pick their bags up, as the roads had continued to worsen that afternoon.  So, I’ve learned.  I’m planning on the dates outlined below, but we will work out alternatives, on a case by case basis, as necessary.

The basic winter package is $240, and that will include eight bags.  You have some options, if you’d like:  you can add eggs or soup.  The specifics are on the signup sheet, which you’ll find by clicking on the contract link at the top of the page.  You’ll send a check to me, but – this is really, really important – if you need to spread out the payment over a few weeks, that’s cool.  Just let me know what your plan is.  (And, as I write this, we still don’t have a state budget, and I know two current Beans who are waiting for back pay as a result.  Please just let me know what’s going on, I can work with you.)

There are pickup locations in Harrisburg, Camp Hill, Mechanicsburg, New Cumberland, and of course, here at the farm.  these pickups would all be on Tuesday, beginning with December 22, 2015, and then running every second week until the end of March.  There will also be a pickup option at the Broad St. Market, at the Radish and Rye stand.  That’s on Fridays, and the first pickup there will be Dec. 18, 2015 – then we’d skip three weeks until January 8th for the second one.  From there, every second week.  I’ll remind you about the skipped week.

If you have any questions, please email me at katie@komta.com, and I’ll get back to you as soon as I can!

Procrastinating friends – yes, there’s still time to get a share for the 2015 CSA season, but the egg option is cut off for 2015. The ladies in the henyard apologize, but they do have their limits!

katie on April 1st, 2015

Just a quick update – still room in the 2015 Cool Beans CSA, but it’s possible that there will be a cutoff on egg shares in another week or so if the current demand continues. I’ll post something here if that’s the case, so if you don’t see a post above this one indicating that egg shares are sold out, you can still add eggs.

It’s finally looking a little ‘springy out there and the beautiful wonderful BCS walk-behind tractor has been fitted with the tiller attachment and is starting to turn soil. I feel like an artist with a huge canvas when I look at this field, which is only one of the places in which Cool Beans veg will be growing this summer!

Dear Beans and Potential Beans:

It’s time to sign up for the 2015 season!  24 weeks of farm fresh produce delivered to convenient pickup locations in the greater Harrisburg area.  All produce is grown sustainably / organically.  Interested in signing up?

If you’re a returning Bean – yay! I love you! – go to the top of the page, print the contract…..you know the routine.  Note the price increase (but discount for early payment which will negate the increase) and an additional pickup location on a different day of the week – most pickups are still on a Tuesday, with this one exception.

If you’re a New Bean – yay! I’m going to love you! – please read All the Stuff, so you know what you’re getting into.  Start at the top of the home page with the link for “About Cool Beans CSA 2015″.  Look over the contract, the link for which is also at the top of the page.  Skim through the posts here, check out the Facebook page.  Check out my ‘competitors’, all of whom are actually good friends, and see if their CSA might be a better fit for you.  If everything looks good, print out the  contract and mail it in.

love from your farmer,

katie

katie on February 4th, 2015

CSA stands for community supported agriculture.  In its earliest inception and truest practice, members pay a proportionate share of the farm’s entire operating expenses for one year and in return receive an equivalent proportion of everything produced on the farm, and often are required to contribute work hours.  Very few CSA operations follow those guidelines strictly – none in this area that I’m aware of.  For most of the central PA CSA programs, it’s more like buying a magazine subscription – you pay up front for a weekly delivery.  (We don’t require work hours here – my insurance agent did not like that idea in the least!)

FULL and SMALL shares:  Cool Beans offers two share sizes.  A full share is a good choice for a family or for a couple who eats a lot of vegetables (or wants motivation to do so.)  A small share is not exactly half of a full share.  Some weeks the small share may contain fewer items, and some weeks it may contain smaller amounts of the same items, or a combination of both.  The best value – by far – is the full share.  I recommend splitting a full share with friends if at all possible.  That way you can alternate pickup weeks,or meet each week to split the bag.

WHAT’S IN YOUR BAGS AND WHEN WILL YOU KNOW THAT:  produce is seasonal (see next) and is only sent if the quality is high.  So I might have ten things that are ‘ready’ but only seven or eight make the cut.   I’m getting better at knowing a few days ahead what’s going to be in your bag but honestly some days we look at the ‘x’ item we thought we’d be harvesting and it’s not quite ready, or had somehow gotten past its prime since the day before.  So there’s a bit of a mystery to this each week.  I post on the Facebook page ahead of time when I can.  I’m getting better at this part of it every year.

QUANTITIES will vary from week to week.  There’s a bell curve to the season; your first bags will not have a lot of weight to them, and will have a lot of salad greens.  Strawberries and asparagus, peas, potatoes, beans and so on – they all follow in sequence.  I am careful not to overwhelm you with massive quantities of anything because none of us wants to waste food.

SEASONAL PRODUCE:  every vegetable and fruit that grows in central PA has a season.  I can extend some of them with low tunnels and hoophouse production, and I do.  But I cannot give you sweet corn in April, and lettuce gets bitter when the temps get to a certain high, and asparagus will not grow in the fall.  Seasonal eating means celebrating the food at its peak.

PICKUP DATE:  Pickups are on Tuesday, with a new twist this year:  I have the option of adding a Friday pickup at the Harvest stand at the Broad St. Market in Harrisburg.  Bags would be there by 11 am.  Here’s the problem:  I can’t do it unless I get at least eight members who want to pick up there.  So it’s included as an option, but I’m asking anyone who signs up for a Friday pickup at Broad St. to indicate if you have a second choice for a Tuesday pickup location, or if you cannot do Tuesday at all.  I’ll let you know ASAP.

WHAT IF YOU CAN’T PICK UP?  The huge advantage of a small CSA is that communication is really easy.  You can text my phone or email me if you’re going to be on vacation, or if you have a flat tire on pickup day, or whatever.  We’ll figure it out.

PICKUP OPTIONS:  Honestly, I wish you’d all pick up here at the farm, because if I had a few more people doing so I could offer a market-style pickup where you’d choose more items each week.  And I have a cold room that allows me to keep your bags at the perfect temperature.   But I realize it’s a long drive for many of you.  I have a pickup spot in Penbrook, about a block from the Wendy’s on Progress Ave.  There’s one in New Cumberland close to downtown, one in downtown Mechanicsburg, and one at a home in Camp Hill near the Fredericksen Library.  And this year, hopefully, at the Broad St. Market (that’s on Friday, the rest are on Tuesday.)  Pickup is also available at the town band rehearsal in New Cumberland on Tuesday nights; you’ll need a second choice location for weeks when there’s no rehearsal.  (EDITED to add a new location for 2016, on Spruce St In Middletown)

 

 

ANY OTHER QUESTIONS?  Contact me at katie@komta.com.

katie on February 4th, 2015

Full disclosure:  I believe every word of this.  But there are also reasons not to join a CSA, so I’ve written a second post, which follows this one.  Please read them both before you make a decision about Cool Beans or any other CSA.

A CSA is an excellent choice for you if you want to expand your culinary horizons and try new and different vegetables.  I try to have the widest possible range represented through the season.  Sometimes that means I’ve grown a vegetable I’ve never eaten myself, and we get to learn about it together!  If you find yourself in a rut of buying the same thing week after week at the supermarket, a CSA can be a great way to break out of that habit.

Almost everything you receive will have been grown close to your home, at my farm just north of Harrisburg.  The exceptions are a few items I don’t grow here, like tree fruit and sweet corn, which I purchase from trusted friends who have similar growing practices. Sometimes I have opportunities to add something really awesome – last year we feasted on fresh fiddlehead ferns from Maine because a friend made a trip up there at exactly the right time.  A retired friend supplements his income by selling blueberries from his backyard patch every year, so I buy from him.  I’ll always let you know if I didn’t grow something, and I’ll tell you about the person who did.

The Cool Beans community has a growing presence on Facebook and more and more members are starting to share tips and recipes.  If something is new to you and the newsletter in the bag isn’t enough help, you can reach out to other Beans for ideas.

If you’re in a CSA – and I include all the local ones, because they’re all run by really good, honest, hardworking people – you are getting the freshest possible produce, often harvested the same day you pick up your bag.  (When it’s something that will store in our climate-controlled cold room safely, it’s picked the day before.  Harvesting one week’s worth of bags can take as many as 40 man-hours, and that can’t be done on pickup days.  We also have to plan around inclement weather, because picking some crops during rain can be very damaging to the plants.)

Your produce will have as few miles on it as possible – it will not have been trucked across the country.

My practices are completely transparent – I will answer any questions you have about procedures here.

I pay my helpers a fair wage – currently, more than I pay myself – and make sure they have frequent breaks and comfortable working conditions.

Membership in Cool Beans helps support charitable donations of food to local food banks and organizations that help the needy.  That doesn’t mean I’m overcharging you for what you’re getting.  It just means I can keep things going here  so that I can also offer that (in the name of the Cool Beans community) to people in need.

And Cool Beans is a journey that we can take together.  I”m not going to stand on a pedestal and preach to you about nutrition and exercise, because I’m new at this stuff myself.  Folks, I’m 56 years old and overweight. Since I started farming full time a few years ago, I’ve made major changes in my life, changes that have given me a new lease on life. I’ve gotten older but less overweight.  :)  I figure we’re in this together, and we can help each other out.